Person looking at the stock market on a tablet

Does eye tracking
have an effect on
economic behavior?

Webinar details

16 minutes

English

Free

Webinar information

A common concern is that use of eye tracking means that research participants know they are being watched and thus modify their behavior. We studied eight popular experimental economics games that had varying levels of social desirability bias (SBD) and found no difference between eye tracking and non-eye tracking conditions based on SBD. Only the risk aversion games showed evidence of differences between eye tracking and non-eye tracking conditions which were driven by outliers with multiple calibration failures; once poor-quality eye tracking data was removed, this difference disappeared.

Event speaker

Dr. Joanna N. Lahey
Associate Professor
Texas A&M University