Eye Tracking Research Toolbox

Course

A 3-day onsite course, taught by experts, that deals with the fundamental unavoidable decision-making problems you will encounter while doing eye tracking research.

Time

Place

Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands

Pricing

795€ (including course materials)

About this course

Eye tracking is a powerful method to study the human mind and behavior. This course will allow you to explore key concepts in eye tracking research and help you to successfully integrate it in your study. The course is divided into two main components: The first one provides a conceptual framework to help you make better decisions when planning and executing a study, allowing you to turn eye tracking data into valuable insights. The second is a practical introduction to the challenges and trade-offs you will encounter during a study, helping you to establishing a set of “good practices” that you can easily transfer to your own research.

Lecturers

Ignace Hooge

Dr. Ignace Hooge

Associate Professor
Faculty of Social & Behavioral Sciences
Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Ignace Hooge (1966) studied physics and received his PhD in 1996. He has been doing eye tracking since 1992 and used many different eye-tracking techniques (coils, video, mobile). Currently, he works in experimental psychology at Utrecht University. Besides science and teaching he worked in commercial marketing research and tested many billboards and advertisements with eye tracking. His research interests range from eye tracking methodology (mainly data analysis), visual perception, attention, and visual search to applied psychology. Currently he is involved in research concerning food choice, packaging, infants and fundamental eye-tracker issues. Ignace was awarded the teacher of the university award in 2015.

Google scholar page

Roy Hessels

Dr. Roy Hessels

Post Doctoral Researcher
Faculty of Social & Behavioral Sciences
Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Roy studied psychology and is currently a postdoc at experimental and developmental psychology at Utrecht University. During his PhD, Roy studied visual search behavior in infancy using eye-tracking, and worked on improving eye-tracking methodology for difficult participant groups. Besides developmental work, he is also involved in eye-tracking in social interaction. Next to his research, Roy teaches psychology students how to set up experiments and analyse data, and was awarded a junior teaching award of the Psychology department in 2016.

Google scholar page