Child in front of Tobii Pro Spectrum eye tracker

Webinar: 
Understanding
child psychology
with eye tracking

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About the webinar

Together with the Leipzig Research Center for Early Child Development in Germany we proudly present our upcoming webinar where experts from prestigious European universities will talk about how they use eye tracking for psychology research with infants and children.

  • Get inspiration from researchers within developmental, educational, and clinical-psychology research
  • Receive answers to your questions in the live Q&A's
  • Learn how to work with the different steps of a screen-based eye tracking study using Tobii Pro Lab in our dedicated session on the topic

Presentation: Understanding child psychology with eye tracking

When: March 31 | 9am EDT | 3pm CEST 

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Agenda

9.00am EDT | 3.00pm CEST 
Introduction and welcome: Julian Schmitz, PhD., University of Leipzig and Peter Reuter, PhD., Tobii Pro

9.05am EDT | 3.05pm CEST 
Robert Hepach, PhD., Associate professor and Fellow, Department of Experimental Psychology, New College in Oxford

9.35am EDT | 3.35pm CEST 
Julian Schmitz, PhD., Professor of clinical child and adolescent psychology, Leipzig University

10.05 am EDT | 4.05pm CEST 
Marisa Biondi, PhD., Senior Research Scientist, Tobii Pro North America

10.50am EDT | 4.50pm CEST 
Susanne Enke, M.Sc., Doctoral researcher, Leipzig University

11.20am EDT | 5.20pm CEST 
Gustaf Gredebäck, PhD., Professor in Developmental Psychology, Uppsala Child and Baby Lab, Uppsala University

The sessions

Assessing visual processing of information in children with social anxiety disorder in laboratory and natural settings

Speaker: Julian Schmitz, PhD., Professor of clinical child and adolescent psychology, Leipzig University

In my presentation I will talk about our data on visual processing of social stimuli and social information in children with social anxiety disorder. Social anxiety disorder is one of the most frequent mental disorders in children, characterized by intensive fear of negative evaluation and avoidance of social situations. Stationary and mobile eye tracking technology offer unique insights into potentially biased processing of social information, which may contribute to the maintenance of social anxiety in children.

The systematic study of pupil dilation: An early ontogeny perspective

Speaker: Robert Hepach, PhD., Associate professor and Fellow, Department of Experimental Psychology, New College in Oxford

In this presentation, I provide an overview of how pupillometry is applied to measure a range of psychological phenomena ranging from surprise responses in so-called violation of expectation paradigms to shifts in arousal state underlying children's motivation (to help others). These recent insights are also a result of researchers developing creative solutions to the single hardest problem in (developmental) pupillometry: Teasing apart psychologically induced pupil dilation from luminance driven changes in pupil size.

Longitudinal eye tracking studies in infancy, how changing preferences impact stability

Speaker: Gustaf Gredebäck, PhD., Professor in Developmental Psychology, Uppsala Child and Baby Lab, Uppsala University

In this presentation I will describe our experience with designing and conducting a longitudinal eye tracking study with 120 infants followed from the age of 6-30 months. I will focus on methodological challenges and results, revealing stability and variability in infant development from infancy to childhood.

Pupil dilation as an indicator of mental effort in monolingual and bilingual children

Speaker: Susanne Enke, M.Sc., Doctoral researcher, Leipzig University

In this presentation I will present data from two studies on cognitive processes in bilingual and monolingual elementary school children. We used Tobii X120 to measure changes in pupil diameter as an indicator of mental effort while children solved two challenging cognitive tasks. We conclude that under certain circumstances bilingual and monolingual children seem to differ in their way of recruiting cognitive resources.

Eye tracking in developmental research: using Tobii Pro's solutions

Speaker: Marisa Biondi, PhD., Senior Research Scientist, Tobii Pro

This session features Tobii Pro's innovative solutions for conducting easy and reliable eye tracking research with infants and children, from computer-based stimulus presentation to wearable applications. We discuss the various hardware options in our portfolio and take you on a walkthrough of Tobii Pro Lab. You will learn how to work with the different steps of a screen-based eye tracking study in Pro Lab, from experimental design, calibration routines, and recording, to analysis and data export.

The speakers

Tobii Pro speaker Robert Hepach

Robert Hepach is associate professor at the Department of Experimental Psychology and a fellow of New College in Oxford. Together with his colleagues, he studies social cognition and motivation in early ontogeny from the first year of life to school-age: How young children’s understanding of the social world shapes their own behavior to initiate, maintain, and repair cooperative relationships with others.

Tobii-Pro-speaker-Gustav-Gredebäck

Gustaf Gredebäck holds a chair in developmental psychology at Uppsala University. He has authored more than 100 papers since his PhD in 2004, specializing in eye tracking, social cognition and experience dependent processes early in life. He has also been published in journals such as Nature Neuroscience, Nature Communication, and Psychological Science. Gredebäck's work includes the first eye tracking methods papers dedicated to infancy (Gredebäck, Johnson, & von Hofsten, 2010), sibling studies and ASD (Falck-Ytter, Bölte, & Gredebäck, 2013), the (re)introduction of pupil dilation as a method to assess perception and cognition in pre-verbal populations (Laeng, Sirois, & Gredebäck, 2012), and open access eye tracking analysis tools-boxes (Nyström, Falck-Ytter, & Gredebäck, 2016).

Tobii Pro speaker Susanne Enke

Susanne Enke is a doctoral researcher at Leipzig University, Germany. She is currently working on finishing her doctoral thesis which focuses on cognitive processes in bilingual versus monolingual children. Her further research interests include executive functioning and academic achievement in early and later childhood.

Tobii Pro speaker Julian Schmitz

Julian Schmitz is professor for clinical child and adolescent psychology at Leipzig university and head of the university's psychotherapy outpatient clinic for children and adolescents. In his research he is interested in psychological basis of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. In his multimethodological approach he uses eye-tracking, EEG, peripheral psychophysiology, behavioral and subjective data from both laboratory experiments and real-life assessments.

Tobii Pro Marisa Bondi

Marisa Biondi is a Senior Research Scientist at Tobii Pro and manages the Funding Support Services program in North America. This position allows her to help build an eye tracking community, through partnerships with researchers hoping to implement eye tracking in their work, or by supporting existing customers in acquiring knowledge or additional grants. Dr. Biondi has a Ph.D. in Psychological & Brain Sciences from Texas A&M University and used fNIRS and eye tracking to study the functional organization of the developing human brain.