Novice versus Expert

Eye tracking is a great methodology to reveal the differences between novice and expert performance. These insights form the basis for designing instructional programs to fit the different learners' needs.

Identify improvement areas

Eye tracking is the perfect tool to understand how novice and expert professionals use their knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform tasks. This allows researchers to understand efficient search patterns and decision-making processes in high-stress situations, such as medical scenarios and surveillance tasks.

By identifying the differences in the strategies novices and experts use to solve a task, researchers can define training programs appropriate for each level to close the knowledge gap.

Tobii Pro eye tracking is used to understand how novice and expert professionals use their knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform tasks.
Tobii Pro eye tracking is used to understand how novice and expert professionals use their knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform tasks.
Tobii Pro eye tracking is used to understand how novice and expert professionals use their knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform tasks.

Human performance research conducted in a dynamic environment using wearable eye tracking - surfing

Wearable eye tracking to study expert versus novice - juggling

Products and services

Tobii Pro offers hardware and software, along with training and support, for the study of human performance in different situations. We have flexible solutions for research in real-world environments and in lab settings.

We have created eye trackers with a range of capabilities- from easy-to-use live viewing in order to get immediate insights to more advanced solutions for the full spectrum of qualitative and quantitative analysis. Read more

Cases

Using Eye Tracking to Analyze Surfers’ Gaze Patterns

Under the name Vision in Motion (VIM), several researchers from different areas of sports science combined their existing research constructs to study perceptual-cognitive expertise in surfing using both eye tracking and motion analysis technology. The insights obtained can help enhance the performance of athletes by optimizing their perception and action patterns. Read more

  • Martin, C., Cegarra, J., & Averty, P. (2011). Analysis of Mental Workload during En-route Air Traffic Control Task Execution Based on Eye-Tracking Technique. In D. Harris (Ed.), Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics (pp. 592–597). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-21741-8_63
  • Marshall, S. P. (2009). What the Eyes Reveal: Measuring the Cognitive Workload of Teams. In V. G. Duffy (Ed.), Digital Human Modeling (pp. 265–274). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-02809-0_29
  • Dehais, F., Causse, M., & Pastor, J. (2008). Embedded eye tracker in a real aircraft: new perspectives on pilot/aircraft interaction monitoring. Presented at the Proceedings from The 3rd International Conference on Research in Air Transportation. Fairfax, USA: Federal Aviation Administration.

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